Leaving after a few months…

Leaving after a few months... Featured Image

Ideally, when starting in a new company, you are expected to stay for at least a year before you switch to a different one. This is often the case, but there are also instances when employees decide to leave a few months after they join- and there are many reasons for this. It may be that the culture is different from what they expected or maybe the initial intent of the role or the scope is far from what was agreed upon.

For most, this may be okay and can be worked on and renegotiated, but some decide to take a different path. Let’s take for example an executive who shared his story when he decided to leave the company he had joined for less than six months. The reason was that the environment was bad, the scope of the role changed the second week after joining, and the initial commitments were not honored.  In short, an utterly unpleasant situation.

Such decisions are never lightly made, as leaving a job so soon after starting a new role, usually, is perceived as a “stain” on the CV that could affect the pursuit of another role. Would the decision to stay longer in the role, despite the unpleasant conditions, be a better one? 

Something to weigh in, when making the decision to leave or stay, could be assessing the trust level you feel when looking at the new commitments. Do you trust they will be respected in the future, despite the bumpy start? If the assurance of a respectful, and valuable collaboration with the employer is not there, probably the best thing is to try to move on as quickly as possible. It is hard to do as it might be a painful experience, but optimistically, there is always at least a 50% chance this could be a “blessing in disguise.”

What steps should one take to move on quickly? 

  1. Check your mindset. Remember that when it comes to your career and growth, you are the one leading the tide. Go with what you think is good for you and what will help you grow.
  2. Be strategic instead of rushing for the change. Although it might seem that you should have your foot on acceleration, before moving into action, be clear on your career objectives, and add checkpoints to your job search strategy that would help you avoid having a similar experience. 
  3. Explore as many avenues as possible, while having your objectives in mind. You may want to ensure your digital presence is highlighting the skills you need in your career,  network regularly, get in touch with specialized recruiters, and join professional organizations to expand your network.
  4. Be ready to explain to prospective employers, with honesty and no judgment, the facts that made you leave your job sooner than you expected. Most prospective future employers would understand the situation.

Changes are part of everyone’s career journey, and although the timing for a change might not be as you wanted it and came unexpectedly, it’s still a valuable learning experience, an opportunity for building resilience, and an open door for new adventures, that might land you exactly on a successful career path.

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